Today's harvest

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I grew some once before. Lion Head and ummm, (oyster?) can't remember. Only really got one harvest from them. Big 1st harvest and very small 2nd, could hardly call it a harvest.
This time I've ordered some little individual tents to go over the kits so maybe the 2nd harvest will be better.
Expensive for what you get but fun and tasty!
 
One fungus I would like to figure out how to grow is huitlacoche. Anybody ever grow this before?
I did one year, by accident. I had no idea what I was dealing with at the time. I learned more about it a few years later. I did absolutely nothing knowingly to promote it.
 
I did one year, by accident. I had no idea what I was dealing with at the time. I learned more about it a few years later. I did absolutely nothing knowingly to promote it.
I'm not sure you can intentionally grow it. I also had it growing and would throw it in the compost pile! It did not look appetizing.
 
The only winter crop I have grown. I am researching doing things differently in the garden this year; realizing my raised beds could be utilized better. This could be the last year to devote an entire raised bed to carrots.
 

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So after not growing at all summer last year, the only thing that's growing now is the parsley. Some of the strawberries survived the deep freeze, but the netting blew off them and the deer ate what didn't die. The rosebush looks dead, the pampas plant looks dead...
They may not be dead, though. Scratch off a little bit of bark from the rose bush. If it's green underneath, it's still alive. The visible part of pampas grass dies back in the winter, but the roots usually survive and it starts growing again in the spring. You remove the dead grass to make room for the new growth.

It does appear to be invasive in parts of Oregon, though. Not sure where you are exactly but I found this: https://turfmagazine.com/or-coastal-residents-asked-to-remove-pampas-grass-from-landscapes
but the tulips are going berserk. I had 8 last year, this year it looks like I'll have a couple dozen. Naturally, it's because we're going through a warm spell right now. By the weekend, temps are supposed to be down to freezing again. Just in time to kill the tulips.
Tulips are tough. A cold winter and a long, wet spring are the perfect conditions for them to thrive.
That thump you just heard was my head hitting the desk.
Gardening has a long learning curve. Like, a lifelong learning curve. Don't let the challenges defeat you.
 
Many, many years ago, huitlacoche was extremely expensive, and was referred to as "Mexican Truffles". The price has come way down, and are much more available, so I'm guessing they have figured out a way to propagate them commercially. I had some frozen ones, but they were nothing exceptional, but the dried ones were much better, and good used in combination with white mushrooms - like boletus/porcini mushrooms, but a different flavor. I'd also like to grow the variety that is made into the dried boletus - definitely my favorite dried mushroom, which I, more often than not, add to any mushroom dish I make. It doesn't take much, for that flavor!
 
Many, many years ago, huitlacoche was extremely expensive, and was referred to as "Mexican Truffles". The price has come way down, and are much more available, so I'm guessing they have figured out a way to propagate them commercially. I had some frozen ones, but they were nothing exceptional, but the dried ones were much better, and good used in combination with white mushrooms - like boletus/porcini mushrooms, but a different flavor. I'd also like to grow the variety that is made into the dried boletus - definitely my favorite dried mushroom, which I, more often than not, add to any mushroom dish I make. It doesn't take much, for that flavor!
Do you have an online source you order the dried huiitlacoche from? or do you find it locally in an ethnic store ? ( I agree, I wasnt impressed with the frozen ones)
 
I remember husking corn one summer and some had black lumps, my mom said it was a fungus called Corn Smut and the bane of the farmers. Maybe it was different stuff or just not known to be edible at the time in perhaps other than Mexico.
 
I remember husking corn one summer and some had black lumps, my mom said it was a fungus called Corn Smut and the bane of the farmers. Maybe it was different stuff or just not known to be edible at the time in perhaps other than Mexico.
It's the same stuff!!! I knew it was supposed to be edible. But with a 10,000 square foot garden of wonderful vegetables, I was not tempted.
 
I guess it's one of those foods that make a person wonder how anyone ever found out it was edible.
It might have been the first person and the same person that found out drinking milk from a cows udder was a good thing. ;) Whoever it was they were probably very hungry.
 
Stone axes must have come in very handy for their mussels and clams. At least until someone accidently dropped one in a fire and discovered they open up for them. Easy peasy!
 
I came across a local farmer that sells Huitlacoche.
with good pictures.
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They may not be dead, though. Scratch off a little bit of bark from the rose bush. If it's green underneath, it's still alive. The visible part of pampas grass dies back in the winter, but the roots usually survive and it starts growing again in the spring. You remove the dead grass to make room for the new growth.

It does appear to be invasive in parts of Oregon, though. Not sure where you are exactly but I found this: https://turfmagazine.com/or-coastal-residents-asked-to-remove-pampas-grass-from-landscapes

Tulips are tough. A cold winter and a long, wet spring are the perfect conditions for them to thrive.

Gardening has a long learning curve. Like, a lifelong learning curve. Don't let the challenges defeat you.
I don't think my pampas plant is going to grow that big. It's like my lilac. They're supposed to get 10' tall. This is its third summer and while it puts out green leaves, it's still only 6" high and I don't think it's grown an inch since I planted it. Likewise, if I cut the leaves down on the pampas plant and it grows a foot high, it won't be any higher than it was last summer.

However, the Scotch broom weed that started to grow last summer next to the willow tree is now taller than the willow tree, which is at leas 6' tall. I need to get someone to mow this year. Seriously, I think I'm going to start growing weeds.

The rose isn't dead and the irises are coming up now. I'd like to get out and do more gardening but if it's not snowing, it's raining. And on top of everything else, my canopy completely collapsed as did my net fence around the rock garden. Now I have ten times more to do than I did before it snowed.
 
And I bet that stuff isn't cheap for those restaurants!

Believe it or not, I have never seen huitlacoche (corn smut) on any menus here in Texas. I've heard all about it, but it is a Mexican delicacy that doesn't seem to have gotten much traction in Texas. It is probably all the rage in NYC.

CD
 
Last night I trimmed my hydroponics plants as some were getting overgrown again, and shading out some others. I still had some of the kale from the last harvest, and it looks fine!
Well over 4 qts of the Russian red kale, from the one plant. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Trimmed Russian red kale, showing the stem that all the leaves have been removed from, on several harvests. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

The bok choy is also producing well, most of it from the plant that bolted quite a while back, yet it still produces many leaves, with small stems.
The large bok choy in the hydro, that bolted, but keeps putting out new leaves after I pinch the flowers.. I left some for later harvests. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

About 4 qts of trimmed bok choy, some from a small plant, the rest from the large bolting plant, that keeps growing! by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Largest trimmed bok choy leaf, about 8 inches. Only one with a large stem. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

I harvested about 3x what I usually do with the leaf lettuce - usually just enough for a salad for me.
Leaf lettuce - harvested more than usual, as it was shading out another plant. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Didn't harvest any of this mustard, but it should grow faster now, as it will get more light. The dill and epazote were growing into the lights again, so I trimmed some of those, too.
Wasabina mustard, in hydro. The red stems are epazote, which I had to cut back. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
 
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