Need to identify these six greens

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.

mileena

Assistant Cook
Joined
Nov 19, 2021
Messages
17
Location
Reno, NV
Hi, this forum helped me before in 2021! I hope you can help again.

I received six bags of fresh greens from a garden someone brought into a food pantry. I am having trouble identifying these. Here are the pics:

1. ??
20230314_173109.jpg

2. Is this parsley?
20230314_173133.jpg

3. Chives??
20230314_173146.jpg

4. ??
20230314_173206.jpg

5. Arugula?
20230314_173224.jpg

6. ??
20230314_173340.jpg

Thaks for any help!
 
I'm not going to be much help. I agree that Larry is probably right about the dill and chives, though my dill has looked a bit different than that - longer leaves and less branching. I think that is just variations though. But, the rest look like baby leaves to me.
 
2 = definitely Dill
3 = Definitely Chives
5 = Maybe Kale
6 = Maybe some kind of Mustard Green

Awesome! I don't use dill, so this is good info. And 5 is kale. Good. I am used to the more crinkly kind of kale, but the leaves do look like the shape of kale after a second look.

I'm not going to be much help. I agree that Larry is probably right about the dill and chives, though my dill has looked a bit different than that - longer leaves and less branching. I think that is just variations though. But, the rest look like baby leaves to me.

Thank you!

4 is swiss chard

I love cruciferous vegetables, but I rarely have eaten chard, so this is excellent to know!

I think you are right, but those really are itty bitty leaves for chard.

Thank you again.
 
2 could be fennel fronds. They look very similar to dill.

If 5 is arugula, it is vastly overgrown and will be extremely bitter and peppery.

6 could also be very young collard greens.
 
<snip>



I love cruciferous vegetables, but I rarely have eaten chard, so this is excellent to know!



Thank you again.
Chard isn't a cruciferous vegetable. I tend to forget and to think of it that way, but it's actually related to beets. You can grow seeds that are cross between beets and chard. They will have chard leaves and a little bitty beet as part of the root.
 
Chard isn't a cruciferous vegetable. I tend to forget and to think of it that way, but it's actually related to beets. You can grow seeds that are cross between beets and chard. They will have chard leaves and a little bitty beet as part of the root.

Thank you for the information. I am wondering though, because numerous sites say it is cruciferous:

https://columbiasurgery.org/news/2015/05/08/crunch-cruciferous-veggies

Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, bok choy, collard greens, radishes, mustard greens, chard, rutabaga, turnips, watercress, arugula, and horseradish. "

https://www.eatingwell.com/article/7961626/what-is-swiss-chard/

"Also known as just plain chard, this cruciferous vegetable and member of the beet family shares traits with spinach and kale and has qualities that you would look for in a vegetable"
 
2 could be fennel fronds. They look very similar to dill.

If 5 is arugula, it is vastly overgrown and will be extremely bitter and peppery.

6 could also be very young collard greens.
If 6 is mustard greens, you'll know just by tasting it. It will have a sharp, mustardy type of taste.

Ok, I went back and tasted this. Definitely tastes like mustard. Mustard greens it is!
 
#5 Arugula could look like that too. If its kale it will have a slight cabbagy taste to it, if its arugula, more spicy.

I went back and tasted this too. More like a cabbagy taste. So kale it is I guess. Thank you. Now I know how to identify this.
 
2 could be fennel fronds. They look very similar to dill.

If 5 is arugula, it is vastly overgrown and will be extremely bitter and peppery.

6 could also be very young collard greens.
They do look very similar, but easily identifiable, as the fennel will an anise/ licorice smell/ flavor.

I also tasted this. My palate is not that great, and I rarely eat either fennel or dill. It tasted a little spicy, maybe somewhat like anise, but I am not sure. It definitely wasn't a strong anise taste like I had in the candy form when I was a child in the 80's.
 
Thank you for the information. I am wondering though, because numerous sites say it is cruciferous:

https://columbiasurgery.org/news/2015/05/08/crunch-cruciferous-veggies

Cruciferous vegetables include broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, cabbage, kale, bok choy, collard greens, radishes, mustard greens, chard, rutabaga, turnips, watercress, arugula, and horseradish. "

https://www.eatingwell.com/article/7961626/what-is-swiss-chard/

"Also known as just plain chard, this cruciferous vegetable and member of the beet family shares traits with spinach and kale and has qualities that you would look for in a vegetable"
Well, according to what Wikipedia and what I have read elsewhere, the brassicas (cruciferous veggies) are descended from mustard and chard and beets are descended from sea beets. All the cruciferous veggies are in the order brassicales and the beets and chard are in the order caryophyllales. But, chard does really seem like it should be in with the brassicas. Actually, I think chard seems more like a brassica than mustard does. But, there ya go.
 
2 could also be coriander (cilantro) just before bolting
But anise taste makes it more likely to be fennel
 
Well, according to what Wikipedia and what I have read elsewhere, the brassicas (cruciferous veggies) are descended from mustard and chard and beets are descended from sea beets. All the cruciferous veggies are in the order brassicales and the beets and chard are in the order caryophyllales. But, chard does really seem like it should be in with the brassicas. Actually, I think chard seems more like a brassica than mustard does. But, there ya go.
Actually, besides being in the same order as beets, it is the same species, but labeled a different "variety" - Beta vulgaris (don't remember the variety!). Surprisingly, the chard has non of that flavor the beets have, that I can't stand!
 
Chard and beets will cross breed so you have to be careful and widely separate them if you are growing both. You can also eat beet greens if they are in decent shape. I made a pasta dish that used golden beets and their greens not long ago.

Rainbow swiss chard makes a very pretty ornamental plant for your yard that is also edible. I planted a bunch around a red hibiscus tree and got compliments. I harvested the leaves as they got bigger so had a continually renewing source of color in the plant bed, plus greens for dinner.
 

Latest posts

Back
Top Bottom