In growing vegetables or plants

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Those would last a long time, from what I've heard, but they are quite deep, so you'll need a lot of soil mix to fill them. The advantage, that people are making deeper beds for, is that they don't have to lean over as far.
 
Welcome to Discuss Cooking! I'm glad you asked the question because I have wondered about them for a while. The soil mix amount has been my hesitation for an area in my backyard!
 
When it comes to growing veggies, I'm all in for the Galvanized Raised Garden Beds. They bring a modern vibe, and the durability is fantastic – no worries about wood rot. The added height is a game-changer, especially for anyone looking to ease up on the bending.
Welcome to DC! May I ask how large of a container you have and what was the medium that you used to fill it?
 
Cost and eventually undoing the garden would be my main concerns.

I would try to do a little low or no cost up cycling.

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Ah, but does anyone have any suggestions for upcycling stuff to make a raised garden; one where bending over wouldn't be necessary.

Doing stuff bent over is one of the things that really, really poops me out. I can usually do a single, quick thing with no problem. Thing is, I don't notice how pooped I got (from doing two or more things) until I stand up straight.
 
You can fill in the bed with branches, and a deep bed like that, larger limbs and branches, that will eventually rot, into humus. Look into Hügelkultur, to get some ideas.
It is amazing what one can "throw" into the ground and then cover up and grow stuff...and, amazingly how little, if any, water you might use to sustain the plants!! Have a friend that does it and I'm dumbfounded.
 
Ah, but does anyone have any suggestions for upcycling stuff to make a raised garden; one where bending over wouldn't be necessary.

Doing stuff bent over is one of the things that really, really poops me out. I can usually do a single, quick thing with no problem. Thing is, I don't notice how pooped I got (from doing two or more things) until I stand up straight.
This is how my hero Jacques Pepin does it.


Use what comes your way, concrete rubble, railroad tiies, an old refrigerator on blocks, just make sure that the width doesn’t extend beyond a comfortable reach.
 
Ah, but does anyone have any suggestions for upcycling stuff to make a raised garden; one where bending over wouldn't be necessary.

Doing stuff bent over is one of the things that really, really poops me out. I can usually do a single, quick thing with no problem. Thing is, I don't notice how pooped I got (from doing two or more things) until I stand up straight.
I've seen beds like this at the nursing home where my MIL lived. They're not suitable for plants with deep roots, but they would work for herbs and shallow-rooted vegetables like squash.
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This is how my hero Jacques Pepin does it.


Use what comes your way, concrete rubble, railroad tiies, an old refrigerator on blocks, just make sure that the width doesn’t extend beyond a comfortable reach.
Do NOT use railroad ties, unless you want creosote, and some other toxic substances in your food. Even things that have been banned for home use, are still used commercially. And even if the railroad ties are sold at retail stores, they are still treated, though with less toxic substances, and you still don't want to grow food near them.
 
Ah, but does anyone have any suggestions for upcycling stuff to make a raised garden; one where bending over wouldn't be necessary.

Doing stuff bent over is one of the things that really, really poops me out. I can usually do a single, quick thing with no problem. Thing is, I don't notice how pooped I got (from doing two or more things) until I stand up straight.

Old claw foot bathtubs make good raised gardens, if you can find one in rough enough shape to buy for cheap.

CD
 
When I was a kid our sandbox was one of those big old John Deere tractor tires.

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And those tractor inner tubes made the BEST river floaties. *sighs in happy memory* Four tubes lashed together made a center that was PERFECT for a cooler that would hold ice and um...milk. Delicious for a river float.
 
And those tractor inner tubes made the BEST river floaties. *sighs in happy memory* Four tubes lashed together made a center that was PERFECT for a cooler that would hold ice and um...milk. Delicious for a river float.
Um, yeah, milk. I'll come right out and say it - I filled empty water bottles with my favorite pink wine while the guys brought beer. The James River in Virginia has some gorgeous places for a nice float.
 
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