Interesting article about "third culture cuisine"

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taxlady

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Sounds very much like the Indonesian food in Netherlands, esp before "exotic" ingredients were available.
That type of food got its own name "Indisch" instead of "Indonesian"
 
I believe I also found that recipe or at least it is the same chef Jon Kung. This site is free. (well, at least it is for me?) Is this the same recipe taxy? Looks great, might try it if I can whittle it down to more manageable size for me.
Jerk Chow Mein
 
I believe I also found that recipe or at least it is the same chef Jon Kung. This site is free. (well, at least it is for me?) Is this the same recipe taxy? Looks great, might try it if I can whittle it down to more manageable size for me.
Jerk Chow Mein
It looks close. I'll send you the link that gets past the paywall. I simply do not have the energy to look carefully and see what might be different. I see that the protein is different.
 
I have a great appreciation of fusion recipes. One of my favorites is German/Mexican fusion.
This isn't just fusion. Fusion recipes can be made by combining two or more cuisines by anyone. Third culture cuisine is the everyday cuisine of people who live in two or more cultures.

If you made some recipe that involved Sicilian cuisine and SoCal cuisine, that would probably qualify as third culture cuisine. It would be even more convincing if you spent a few months in Sicily every once in a while.
 
I have a great appreciation of fusion recipes. One of my favorites is German/Mexican fusion.
Would that be the Texas version of 'Chicken Fried Steak'?
It looks close. I'll send you the link that gets past the paywall. I simply do not have the energy to look carefully and see what might be different. I see that the protein is different.
The two major changes to the original recipe are your choice of protein. Original gives you a choice of chicken, beef, pork, not just tofu. Same goes for the vegie, your choice of a hard vegie, such as cauliflower, broccoli, baby pak choi not just mangetout (snow peas).

There might be changes in the instructions - I didn't go to them in depth, just a quick glance looked the same.
 
Yeah, I was really into fusion back in the early 80's mostly French, which I'm formally trained in and Chinese cuisine, it was a lot of fun considering I was also into classic Chinese food at the time as well. brings back memories. :)
 
Would that be the Texas version of 'Chicken Fried Steak'?

Texas chicken fried steak is not really a fusion dish, and not German/Mexican for sure. It was created by German immigrants to central Texas, and it is just a version of a German schnitzel made with ingredients that were abundant in Texas when they arrived, particularly beef instead of pork.

CD
 
LOL, I was just kidding casey, but what if it was served with Chili as a side?

I guess my "fusion" times are what ever I have in the cupboard and it goes into the pan. But I agree Kathleen - it is either a wonderful success or complete fail, there doesn't seem to be and in between.
 
LOL, I was just kidding casey, but what if it was served with Chili as a side?

I guess my "fusion" times are what ever I have in the cupboard and it goes into the pan. But I agree Kathleen - it is either a wonderful success or complete fail, there doesn't seem to be and in between.

I really like chicken fried steak, and really like Texas chili. I'm not sure I would want to combine them.

However, I had chicken fried steak once done like chicken parmesan, and it was really darned good.

CD
 
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