Whatever happened to 'normal' sized croutons?

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Linda0818

Head Chef
Joined
Dec 5, 2018
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Location
Columbus, Ohio
That's the loaf! A lot of classic French dishes trim the thin crusts off, to use it, but I rarely do that. But if so, they make good bread crumbs, too. ;)
It looks amazing. I'd love to try it very lightly toasted and spread with some quality butter.

It's those simple little things in life that make it all worth it. And a good piece of buttered toast is one of those things :yum:
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
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Location
Woodbury, NJ
It does make delicious toast!

And if you want to make it in a regular pan, without buying a special pan, something I often saw suggested in old books was to half fill a pan with the dough, and put a cookie sheet on top, with a brick, or something heavy, like CI. Never tried it, however.

Here's the actual dough recipe that I use - it's not a moist dough, and is fairly stiff.

2 tb yeast
1 1/2 c water (or scalded milk, if not using milk powder)
1/3 c milk powder (optional)
2 tsp honey
6 1/2 c unbleached flour
4 tsp salt
1/2 c unsalted butter, softened

I usually made this in the Kitchen Aid, but occasionally I would make it in the FP - a half a recipe at a time, combined briefly by hand, before rising. And the dough would rise 2-2 1/2 hrs to double, then a second rise of 1 - 1 1/2 hrs, before the rise in the pan, which would be to fill the pan just over 3/4 full, before baking - a short rise, which is the reason for the two rises before. It is baked 55 min. in a 350° oven - started in a 400° oven, and turned down when put in.

And two variations I often did with the dough - substitute 1/2 c wheat germ for an equal amount of flour, or substitute up to 2 c WW flour, for an equal amount of white. A little more nutritious, but still the same flavor, for the most part.
 

Linda0818

Head Chef
Joined
Dec 5, 2018
Messages
1,307
Location
Columbus, Ohio
It does make delicious toast!

And if you want to make it in a regular pan, without buying a special pan, something I often saw suggested in old books was to half fill a pan with the dough, and put a cookie sheet on top, with a brick, or something heavy, like CI. Never tried it, however.

Here's the actual dough recipe that I use - it's not a moist dough, and is fairly stiff.

2 tb yeast
1 1/2 c water (or scalded milk, if not using milk powder)
1/3 c milk powder (optional)
2 tsp honey
6 1/2 c unbleached flour
4 tsp salt
1/2 c unsalted butter, softened

I usually made this in the Kitchen Aid, but occasionally I would make it in the FP - a half a recipe at a time, combined briefly by hand, before rising. And the dough would rise 2-2 1/2 hrs to double, then a second rise of 1 - 1 1/2 hrs, before the rise in the pan, which would be to fill the pan just over 3/4 full, before baking - a short rise, which is the reason for the two rises before. It is baked 55 min. in a 350° oven - started in a 400° oven, and turned down when put in.

And two variations I often did with the dough - substitute 1/2 c wheat germ for an equal amount of flour, or substitute up to 2 c WW flour, for an equal amount of white. A little more nutritious, but still the same flavor, for the most part.

Thanks for the recipe and the tips.

This may sound like a silly question, but when you say "milk powder", do you mean just your standard dried/powdered milk? Or is there a special milk powder you need to use?
 

pepperhead212

Executive Chef
Joined
Nov 21, 2018
Messages
3,607
Location
Woodbury, NJ
Thanks for the recipe and the tips.

This may sound like a silly question, but when you say "milk powder", do you mean just your standard dried/powdered milk? Or is there a special milk powder you need to use?
Just the nonfat powdered milk - something I have always kept on hand for things like this, as I rarely have milk on hand, unless it is for a recipe, though I often have buttermilk and yogurt in the fridge. Also, I don't recall the specifics, but the everyday powder, since it is heated to high temps, is like using scalded milk, and better for bread.
 

Linda0818

Head Chef
Joined
Dec 5, 2018
Messages
1,307
Location
Columbus, Ohio
Just the nonfat powdered milk - something I have always kept on hand for things like this, as I rarely have milk on hand, unless it is for a recipe, though I often have buttermilk and yogurt in the fridge. Also, I don't recall the specifics, but the everyday powder, since it is heated to high temps, is like using scalded milk, and better for bread.

Excellent. Thank you.

I have powdered milk in my store room, along with emergency food kits and some stock of canned goods. I mean, you never know.
 
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