Scallions are always rotting!

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Andy M.

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We get them small bunches secured with rubber bands. When I get them home I remove the rubber bands and wrap them a paper towel then put them back into the plastic bag they came in then into the fridge. They seem to last a long time.
 

Quickdraw

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Sep 1, 2023
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Olympia, WA
A week is pretty good! I've tried storing them with the root ends in a glass of water, but I have better results with:
-wash and dry
-wrap them in a barely damp paper towel
-put 'em in a big zip lock bag and roll it to remove most of the air
when you get ready to use:
-trim off any wilted greens
-when the whites get too soft for your liking, peel off a layer
Recently, I've had decent results storing chopped scallions in glassware with a lid.
 

taxlady

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I have often just stored unwrapped scallions in the fridge, with the rubber band left on. Yeah, the green ends start to dry from the top. Sometimes some of the ones in the middle get somewhat slimy on the outside. I just cut or pinch off the dry bits. I tear off a leaf, all the way down, when the outside leaf or leaves get slimy. I always figure on doing "triage" on my scallions, unless I bought them a day or two ago. Some of the outer leaves start to get a bit dry and I peel those off. But, there's usually plenty of usable scallion left two or three weeks after I buy them. I just need to do the triage. I find they deteriorate faster in a bag unless it is very well ventilated.
 

dragnlaw

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I too, wrap in paper towel, put back in plastic bag. But don't forget them 'cause then even a triage won't save them. They can go 3 weeks but obviously deteriorate over that time.
 

larry_stewart

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Long Island, New York
I can totally relate. To extend them, I've been re-growing my store bought scallions.

View attachment 66873
I do the same some indoors, and some I jus plant the bottom two inches ( white par) right in a pot or garden. They ultimately go to flower, but I still get enough greens to make it worth while. I have them/ harvest them outside days a year. The winter hasn't killed them yet.

In the fridge, I just leave them rubber-banded in the produce drawer, and like others, keep an eye on them to periodically trim off the leaves that are drying out or starting to spoil. I saw somewhere ( maybe even here) where some one pre cuts them and puts the pieces in an empty water bottle then freezes. When needed, just opens the bottle and shakes out what they need. Never tried it, and I prefer fresh, bt if I had excess I'd give it a go.
 

GinnyPNW

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Please tell me about this setup. Thanks!
I use an AeroGarden machine. For the scallions, I like one of the Bounty machines. There are other machines and other manufacturers, but my experience is mostly limited to the AeroGardens. I grow lots of other things too. Flowers in the kitchen...and herbs and greens for the kitchen. :) No affiliations, just a happy customer. If you have specific questions, please feel free to give a shout.
 

larry_stewart

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Ive done it in may Aquaponics set up ( which uses fish in a fish tank below the veggies to help fertilize), but my fish died when I did it. I wasnt sure of I the onions just weren't good for the fish, as the water flowed through their roots then recirculated into the tank. But these scallion ends are practically indestructible. Ive found ones in the fridge that were significantly dried out, showing minimal signs of life, and they still grew and sprouted leaves I can use.
 

GinnyPNW

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Ive done it in may Aquaponics set up ( which uses fish in a fish tank below the veggies to help fertilize), but my fish died when I did it. I wasnt sure of I the onions just weren't good for the fish, as the water flowed through their roots then recirculated into the tank. But these scallion ends are practically indestructible. Ive found ones in the fridge that were significantly dried out, showing minimal signs of life, and they still grew and sprouted leaves I can use.
You are a much braver soul than I! I love the hydroponics. I wouldn't want to mess with aquaponics! Right now, I have close to a dozen gardens growing. I can't imagine all the fish I might need...LOL. ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ
 

taxlady

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I have a few scallion bottoms growing in a very small jar. They are growing happily in that jar. I change the water every few days. It's the first time I have tried this. I'll have to see what I can do to grow more of them at once.
 

larry_stewart

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You are a much braver soul than I! I love the hydroponics. I wouldn't want to mess with aquaponics! Right now, I have close to a dozen gardens growing. I can't imagine all the fish I might need...LOL. ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ๐ŸŸ
It was kind of a spur of the moment thing. I saw it online or read about it somewhere, and it seemed cool. I found a beginner set up, and it worked well until I grew scallions. Not sure if its was a scallion thing or a me thing, but I stopped putting them in the system since then.
 

Xocolatl

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I chop them up, put them in a freezer bag ( portioned) and just add them to my dish when needed. No defrosting needed with a hot dish. And always fresh this way.
 

taxlady

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I chop them up, put them in a freezer bag ( portioned) and just add them to my dish when needed. No defrosting needed with a hot dish. And always fresh this way.
I think I should try that. Hmm, maybe when the freezer isn't so stuffed. But, that's only good for cooking with, isn't it? I can't imagine using that in a tuna salad. Won't the texture have gotten softer?
 

Xocolatl

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I think I should try that. Hmm, maybe when the freezer isn't so stuffed. But, that's only good for cooking with, isn't it? I can't imagine using that in a tuna salad. Won't the texture have gotten softer?
Well the texture does get softer, I personally don't mind that. But usually I make things like tuna salad the day I buy the scallions, and then freeze whats left for use in a hot dish. It's the most efficient way to do it I think.
 

dragnlaw

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Waterdown, Ontario
I use an AeroGarden machine. For the scallions, I like one of the Bounty machines. There are other machines and other manufacturers, but my experience is mostly limited to the AeroGardens. I grow lots of other things too. Flowers in the kitchen...and herbs and greens for the kitchen. :) No affiliations, just a happy customer. If you have specific questions, please feel free to give a shout.
Do you happen to have a picture of your flower one? With flowers? Which kind?
Please?
 

abd55

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Nov 13, 2023
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Location
pakistan
Scallions are a popular ingredient in many dishes, but they can be tricky to store. They can rot quickly if they are not stored properly. Here are some tips for storing scallions to keep them fresh for longer:

  • Trim the roots and ends. The roots and ends of scallions can dry out and become tough, so it's best to trim them off before storing.
  • Wash them thoroughly. Scallions can be dirty, so it's important to wash them thoroughly under running water before storing them.
  • Dry them completely. Moisture can cause scallions to rot, so it's important to dry them completely after washing them. You can use a paper towel or a clean kitchen towel to dry them.
  • Store them in a cool, dark place. Scallions should be stored in a cool, dark place, such as the refrigerator. You can wrap them in a damp paper towel or place them in a plastic bag with a few holes punched in it.
  • Use them within a week. Scallions will start to rot after a week, so it's best to use them within that time frame.
 
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