Mixing Cake Batter

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goldfinger

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Aug 29, 2010
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Hello

Does it make a difference if a cake recipe calls for mixing the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients but instead I mix the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients?

I'm a single guy who has no bowls other then the one for my KitchenAid mixer. I really don't see what difference it would make but please enlighten me.

Thanks
 

Andy M.

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What's important is the mix the dry ingredients together then mix the wet ingredients together separately. Then you can combine them in your single bowl quickly.
 

dragnlaw

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Agree with Andy. Left to right or right to left, doesn't matter. The mixing before separately is what's important.

Also when mixing butter and sugar, egg it is usually done in the mixer as the mixer is easier than doing it by hand. Therefore the dry ingredients are in another bowl - or your measuring spoon - or on wax paper, parchment paper - or on a large dinner plate.

So when you have to add dry to wet you can now just tilt/spoon it from what ever container/plate you have it in/on.

Also when a cake from scratch is made you are sometimes even adding a liquid between your additions of dry and so you will be needing to do this directly into your Kitchenaid.

Make sense?

and Hello goldfinger, Welcome to DC!
 

Chief Longwind Of The North

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The only difference is mixing dry into wet insures that there is no dry missed in the bottom of the bowl, which can happen if you mix the of the wet into the dry. Just make sure to start slow to avoid splashing the dry mix oùt of the bowl.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
 
Last edited:

goldfinger

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Aug 29, 2010
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Thanks Everyone

Just about every cake recipe I've seen says add the wet ingredients to the dry. That's why I posted here to find out if it really made any difference.

I'm guessing it's because the dry ingredients would fly out of the bowl easier thus making a big mess. Going to be careful when adding the flour,etc.

Thanks again.
 

Just Cooking

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Springfield, MO
The only difference is mixing dry into wet insures that there is no dry missed in the bottom of the bowl, which can happen if you mix the of the wet into the dry. Just make sure to start slow to avoid splashing the dry mix oùt of the bowl.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North

That's interesting, Chief. :)

I learned to mix wet into dry and that's the only reason I still do so. Habit, I guess. :ermm:

Ross
 

GotGarlic

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Hi and welcome to Discuss Cooking [emoji2]
Thanks Everyone

Just about every cake recipe I've seen says add the wet ingredients to the dry. That's why I posted here to find out if it really made any difference.

I'm guessing it's because the dry ingredients would fly out of the bowl easier thus making a big mess. Going to be careful when adding the flour,etc.

Thanks again.
How strange. Every recipe I've seen says the opposite - mix dry ingredients and set aside, mix wet ingredients in another bowl, then add dry to wet, usually in two or three additions, to allow for thorough mixing.

You might want to check out thrift stores for inexpensive bowls and other kitchen gear you may need or want.
 

Cooking Goddess

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Most every recipe I have for from scratch baking (coffee cake, muffins and the like) has you add dry to wet. If I first cream sugar and fat together, the liquid and dry ingredients alternate, starting and ending with dry. BUT when you make those kinds of baked goods from a box mix, you usually add the liquids to the dry package mix. *scratches head* I suppose in most cases it doesn't matter as long as everything gets blended well.
 

taxlady

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Most every recipe I have for from scratch baking (coffee cake, muffins and the like) has you add dry to wet. If I first cream sugar and fat together, the liquid and dry ingredients alternate, starting and ending with dry. BUT when you make those kinds of baked goods from a box mix, you usually add the liquids to the dry package mix. *scratches head* I suppose in most cases it doesn't matter as long as everything gets blended well.

Wouldn't some of the cake mix float until it got wet, if you added it to the liquid? I guess it depends on how thick the liquid is.
 

GotGarlic

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Wouldn't some of the cake mix float until it got wet, if you added it to the liquid? I guess it depends on how thick the liquid is.
It doesn't matter. Cake mix is formulated to dissolve quickly in whatever liquid is added to it. Just start stirring and it will be fine.
 

taxlady

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It doesn't matter. Cake mix is formulated to dissolve quickly in whatever liquid is added to it. Just start stirring and it will be fine.

I haven't used a cake mix since some time in the 1980s. I don't remember much about using them. I do remember that lumps were not an issue. But, maybe that is in part because the instructions are to add the liquid to the cake mix, not add the cake mix to the liquid.
 

Pie-eyed

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I`ve made cakes from scratch without following all the rules about dry and wet. Maybe if I were in a bake-off or some cake expert were going to judge the results, it would be apparent to them, but the world never quit spinning or the sky fall in, so.... I`ve never had any complaints about how a cake turns out either. Just start with beating the eggs really well. ♫♫♪Do whatcha wanna do...♪♫
 

cookiecrafter

Senior Cook
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Aug 10, 2021
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Chicago
I put dry ingredients in bowl and mix. Next stir dry to form a well. Lastly put wet ingredients in well and stir inside well briefly to break up eggs then mix wet & dry to form batter.

Note: You can always make do with a large plastic bag for mixing. We always use one for pancake batter when camping.
 
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