Do you trust Indian restaurants for cleanliness?

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Roll_Bones

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I knew an Indian man from work. His wife did all the cooking and she was so clean about things I am surprised she did not use soap on meats and vegetables.
The only negative thing about her cooking may have been how overcooked everything was. At least it over cooked IMO.
Very nice people and I would have not worried one bit about cleanliness.
With restaurants I don't get to see what happens in the kitchen and frankly I have never been concerned about it.
 

taxlady

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You know a dirty restaurant when you see one. If you go back a second time it is not their fault.
Really? If the front is dirty, that's one thing. But, without actually going into the kitchen, how do you know how clean they keep that? I have often enough cleaned my house before guests were coming. You really don't want to look in the spare room, etc. I know I'm not the only one who cleans what I expect people to see and do a half-arsed job on the rest. I imagine there are many restos like that. Otherwise, there would be fewer restos failing cleanliness checks. And even if everything seems clean, is it really? I have seen people just wipe something that really needed to be washed. I see YouTube videos of professional chefs handling meat and then sticking their fingers into the salt to grab a pinch. That wouldn't happen when I'm cooking.
 
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Roll_Bones

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Really? If the front is dirty, that's one thing. But, without actually going into the kitchen, how do you know how clean they keep that? I have often enough cleaned my house before guests were coming. You really don't want to look in the spare room, etc. I know I'm not the only one who cleans what I expect people to see and do a half-arsed job on the rest. I imagine there are many restos like that. Otherwise, there would be fewer restos failing cleanliness checks. And even if everything seems clean, is it really? I have seen people just wipe something that really needed to be washed. I see YouTube videos of professional chefs handling meat and then sticking their fingers into the salt to grab a pinch. That wouldn't happen when I'm cooking.
I must admit I do that with the salt as well. I'm busted.
But, wouldn't the salt kill any unwanted bacteria? I am asking.
 

georgevan

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Really? If the front is dirty, that's one thing. But, without actually going into the kitchen, how do you know how clean they keep that? I have often enough cleaned my house before guests were coming. You really don't want to look in the spare room, etc. I know I'm not the only one who cleans what I expect people to see and do a half-arsed job on the rest. I imagine there are many restos like that. Otherwise, there would be fewer restos failing cleanliness checks. And even if everything seems clean, is it really? I have seen people just wipe something that really needed to be washed. I see YouTube videos of professional chefs handling meat and then sticking their fingers into the salt to grab a pinch. That wouldn't happen when I'm cooking.
Good reply. The bottom line is one never knows for sure and eating out is taking a chance.
 

Marlingardener

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I have gotten food poisoning at a Cajun restaurant and at an Italian restaurant. As georgevan said,
eating out is taking a chance.

Most home kitchens wouldn't pass a health inspection. I clean a lot and don't have anything growing in the fridge, but I'd bet my kitchen wouldn't pass inspection. That said, most home cooks are very aware of keeping everything clean. Restaurants also know they can be shut down and therefore lose revenue. I'd look at the reviews of an Indian restaurant and decide to "take a chance" or not.
 

taxlady

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I must admit I do that with the salt as well. I'm busted.
But, wouldn't the salt kill any unwanted bacteria? I am asking.
I have wondered about that too. I imagine it does, but how fast? I have seen chefs dip into that same salt cellar moments later and put the salt onto/into something that will be served raw. Once it is on or in other food, it gets diluted and I'm sure it loses a lot of its microbe killing power.

But, that was just an example. I see chefs use the same spoon to taste the food repeatedly. Maybe the few microbes that get back into the food get killed by heat, but I don't allow that at my house. I use a teaspoon for tasting and a tablespoon (or the spoon I'm stirring the pot with) to dip into the pot and dribble the food into the teaspoon. I think I got the idea of using two different sizes of spoons from @Andy M.
 

Marlingardener

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There is a website for the inspection results for counties. Just do a search on "restaurant inspections, county name".
I look up any restaurant we are thinking about patronizing, and see their results. Also, Yelp has patron reviews that are subjective, but give you an idea of whether or not you want to dine there.
 

Roll_Bones

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I have wondered about that too. I imagine it does, but how fast? I have seen chefs dip into that same salt cellar moments later and put the salt onto/into something that will be served raw. Once it is on or in other food, it gets diluted and I'm sure it loses a lot of its microbe killing power.

But, that was just an example. I see chefs use the same spoon to taste the food repeatedly. Maybe the few microbes that get back into the food get killed by heat, but I don't allow that at my house. I use a teaspoon for tasting and a tablespoon (or the spoon I'm stirring the pot with) to dip into the pot and dribble the food into the teaspoon. I think I got the idea of using two different sizes of spoons from @Andy M.
I haven't had any issue with the salt? I only pinch from Kosher salt. Table salt is in a shaker. I use Kosher most all of the time. Maybe we are somewhat immune as I do all the cooking and I only have my wife as the guest 99% of the time.
I am busted again. I test/taste food and stir food with the same spoon. I even lick the wooden utensil sometimes. And I do this regularly.
I know its wrong, but I do it anyway. I live on the edge....lol
 

larry_stewart

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I am busted again. I test/taste food and stir food with the same spoon. I even lick the wooden utensil sometimes. And I do this regularly.
I know its wrong, but I do it anyway. I live on the edge....lol
When cooking for guests I'm usually more careful, but if its just me and my wife, I break a lot of the double dipping rules, and boy, do I get yelled at when I lick mu chefs knife and claim that it is clean. Not to mention the risk of severing my tongue.
 

Real Help

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Yeah. I trust them, not just a specific one, Indian, Italian, Greek, etc until I'm proven wrong, if I'm proven wrong.
 

asianfoodea

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delhi
Indian restaurants are a popular option for those looking to enjoy a delicious, hygienic meal. The cuisine itself is a unique blend of spices and flavors that is sure to delight the palate. These restaurants ensure that they follow the highest standards of hygiene and cleanliness, guaranteeing patrons peace of mind when eating there. Furthermore, the staff at these restaurants are usually friendly and accommodating, making sure each experience is a pleasant one.
 

Silversage

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They have different standards in India.
If you plan to eat in a restaurant in any other country but yours, you might want to check the regulations first, before you travel there. If it concerns you, don't travel.

However, any restaurant in this country has to follow all local regulations. Period. Those that violate may be steakhouses, fast food, diners, Mexican, Italian, French, Indian, or any thing else. They are inspected regularly, and closed for serious violations. End of statement.

Singling out any one ethnic food only indicates the person's own biases, not the cleanliness of any one culture.
 
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