Brown vs. white rice

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Marlingardener

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I have been told that brown rice is better for my diabetic husband. White rice is a no-no. Is this true, and if so, how do you use brown rice?
Recipes most welcome!
 

SEEING-TO-BELIEVE

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i've heard and tried to cook brown rice like pasta in a lot of boiling water without salt..... {add salt later}
i can try to find the recipe.....

don't forget to store the uncooked rice in the freezer if you will not use it fast..

i don't find the recipe. i've one in hebrew in my website if you want to translate..
 

Marlingardener

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Thank you, I'll try cooking the brown like white rice, but just longer. The offer of a recipe is good of you, but I'll not try to translate.
I store all rice in the freezer. With just the two of us, even one pound of rice lasts quite a while.
 

taxlady

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I have been using brown rice for decades. In fact, I have never cooked white rice, unless my mum had me cook some Minute rice when I was a kid. I like the flavour better. I have tried the pasta method, but I found it had lost some flavour. Some people might prefer that.

I use twice as much water, by volume, as rice. I rinse the rice before I put it in the pot. I add the water and about 1/4 teaspoon of salt. Somehow, it seems to help with the texture. When I didn't add salt, it was a bit stickier or mushier. Anyways, I bring the water to a boil and boil the rice for 5-10 minutes. Then, I lower the heat to a simmer, put the lid on and cook the rice for a total of about 50 minutes to 1 hour for regular brown rice or a total of about 35 to 40 minutes for brown basmati rice. Do not stir the rice. You can check to see if it is ready. I put a wooden spoon into the rice, all the way to the bottom. I lean the spoon so that it pushes the rice a little bit and I can see the bottom. If all the water is absorbed, it should be done, but I always sample a few grains of rice from the bottom. This timing works for me in an enamelled, cast iron pot. The times are approximate, so you might want to check a bit before the times I gave.
 

dragnlaw

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When you say "you have been told" are you saying his/your doctor said? Don't get me wrong, of course I believe brown rice is healthier than white in any scenario (LOL, just not my favourite, healthy or not). It just sounded like you weren't sure and looking for doctoral advice on a diabetic diet.
 

Marlingardener

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A dietician told me to use brown rice. She was quite thorough, asking me about ingredients frequently used in cooking. I generally want second opinions, which is why I asked about rices here.
Taxlady's instructions were most helpful!
 

pepperhead212

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@Marlingardener Back when I was researching diabetic foods, and was trying to help my Mother with her diet, I found many articles about rice, and that some parboiled was actually better for diabetics, as far as GI and GL, than brown rice. Basmati brown is around 55 GI, while some PB is down in the 40s. However, brands differ, and lowest GI tested was Uncle Ben's (or whatever it's called now). Supposedly the parboiled rice has more "resistant starch", than just regular rice. And another thing that helps with rice, as well as many other starches, such as pasta - cooking, refrigeration, then reheating, is another way of forming the resistant starch.
 

dragnlaw

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I totally agree with taxy's way of doing the rice, albeit I think I cooked mine slightly longer. You will just have to experiment to see what suits you best.
I've also used the microwave with great success. I used to do wild first, then add brown and lastly the white. It gave a good mix and I loved it. Perhaps that mix is not for his diet but just an idea you might try with just brown.
 

Aunt Bea

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I'm a diabetic and continue to use small amounts of white rice.

IMO portion size is more important than the nutritional differences between white vs. brown rice.

Serve the rice with high fiber low carb vegetables to minimize the concentrated carbohydrates in the rice.

Also, consider using riced cauliflower in place of rice as a low-carb alternative to rice.
 

Badjak

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That is incorrect. As taxlady mentioned, you need to double the water.
What it's meant to say is that whatever dish that is cooked with white rice can be made with brown rice.
I never talked about how to boil it (ratio's). Just that it needs to boil longer.

I don't normally cook brown rice via absorption. I find it works best with plenty water, then move to a steamer (colander above boiling water) to finish off.
Parboiled brown rice is easier to prepare (and keep the grains loose), but needs to boil longer again.
 

Marlingardener

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I sincerely thank you all for your replies. I prepared brown rice to go with marinated chicken breasts last night, and my husband liked the brown better than white! I followed suggestions, cooked longer with more liquid (I used homemade chicken stock) and it turned out perfect.
Again, thank you!
 

anitasharp5

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I recommend 1¾ cups of water for every 1 cup of brown rice. Salt is essential: Use about ½ teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt (or a heaping ¼ teaspoon Morton kosher) per cup of rice. Bring the rice to a simmer in a heavy-bottomed medium saucepan over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to a simmer and cook, covered, until rice is tender and water has evaporated, 40–45 minutes. Fluff gently and let sit, covered, off heat, for 10 minutes to make it as light and fluffy as possible.
 

taxlady

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I'm glad your husband liked the brown rice, Marlingardener.

When I have freezer space, I usually cook two cups of brown rice at a time. I freeze what's left in single serving packets. I use waxed paper to wrap the individual servings and then put them all in a zipper top, freezer bag. The packets can be nuked to ready-to-serve, from frozen, in a very short time. Before I had a microwave oven, I used to steam them from frozen. That was quick too.
 

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